Plant and krauss dating

It's the most organically atmospheric tune on the set -- not in terms of production, but for lyric and compositional content. Plant's own obsession with old rockabilly and blues tunes is satisfied on the set's opener, "Rich Woman," by Dorothy La Bostrie and Mc Kinley Miller.It's all swamp, all past midnight, all gigolo boasting.The bridge seems to be producer T-Bone Burnett and the band assembled for this outing: drummer Jay Bellerose (who seems to be the session drummer in demand these days), upright bassist Dennis Crouch, guitarists Marc Ribot and Burnett, with Greg Leisz playing steel here and there, and a number of other guest appearances.Krauss, a monster fiddle player, only does so on two songs here. Burnett has only known one speed these last ten years, and so the material chosen by the three is mostly very subdued.Slow, plodding, almost crawling, Krauss' harmony vocal takes it to the next step, adds the kind of lonesome depth that makes this a song whispered under a starless sky rather than just another lost love song.Waits and Kathleen Brennan's "Trampled Rose," done shotgun ballad style, is, with the Phillips tune, the most beautiful thing here.

What seems to be an unlikely pairing of former Led Zeppelin vocalist Robert Plant and bluegrass superstar Alison Krauss is actually one of the most effortless-sounding duos in modern popular music.Krauss near the top of her range sighs into the rhythm.Patrick Warren's toy piano sounds more like a marimba, and his pump organ adds to the percussive nature of this wary hymn from the depths.Krauss' wordless vocal in the background creates a nice space for that incessant series of rhythms to play to.The next three tunes are cagey, even for this eclectic set: Mel Tillis' awesome ballad "Stick with Me Baby" sounds more like Dion & the Belmonts on the street corner on cough syrup and meaning every word.

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